DEPARTMENT of ITALIAN STUDIES

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

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SURVEY OF ITALIAN LITERATURE: GENERAL

Survey of Italian Literature: Dante

1.

Rating: 7/10

Site: (http://www.italy1.com/literature/)

Comments: This page gives a very brief history of each period in Italian Literature, but may be useful to first year students.

2.

Rating:

Site: Italica (http://www.italica.org/)

Comments: Professor Librandi recommended this site to me. It may be useful for the Italian Lit. survey course (300y), as there are introductory articles on Dante, Svevo, and 100 Renaissance works contained in the "facolta`" section of the site (see http://www.italica.org/3d/3livello/facolta/f_facolta.htm)

3.

Rating: 7/10

Site: BYU Harold B. Lee Library Research Guide: Italian Language & Literature (http://library.byu.edu/~rdh/euro/italplan.html)

Comments:Great for links to other Italian literature sites, and as a starting point for online research in Italian literature.

4.

Rating: 7/10

Site: Antologia (frammentaria) della Letteratura Italiana (http://www.crs4.it/HTML/Literature.html)

Comments: A good site for texts online (Dante, Boccacio, Manzoni, Leopardi, etc.).

5.

Rating: 10/10

Site: Liber Liber (http://www.liberliber.it/home/index.htm)

Comments: An amazing site. "Una biblioteca digitale di testi elettronici, accessibili gratuitamente."

6.

Rating: 7/10

Site: http://www.silab.it/frox/200/pwhomita.htm

Comments: "Il Duecento è un archivio che raccoglie testi della poesia italiana antica, del periodo che va dalle origini fino a Dante. Nel corso degli ultimi anni, ho raccolto un grande corpus testuale, probabilmente il più grande archivio del genere, e comunque l'unico disponibile in rete."

7.

Rating: (none, just links)

Site: Periodi e movimenti (http://www.yahoo.it/Arte_e_cultura/Lettere_e_filosofia/Letteratura/Periodi_e_movimenti/)

Commenti: Links to various periods in Italian literature (Renaissance, Verismo, Romanticismo, Neoclassicismo, etc.)

SURVEY OF ITALIAN LITERATURE: DANTE

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Dante and Virgil

1.

Rating: 10/10

Site: Otfried Lieberknecht's Homepage for Dante Studies (http://members.aol.com/lieberk/welc_old.html)

Comments: The best Dante site. Resources include: E-texts of Dante's works Dante's works in translation, Online publications on Dante, Online bibliographies on Dante, Online bibliographies of related interest, Exhibitions, illustrations, Dante's reception in music, Web based Dante projects, Dante societies, Dante conferences and announcements, Work in progress, Infos on Dante scholars.

2.

Rating: 9/10

Site: Columbia Univerisity's Dante website, "Digital Dante" (http://www.ilt.columbia.edu/projects/dante/index.html)

Comments: Packed with resources, including three different online additions of The Divine Comedy. Also has up to date news on events pertaining to Dante.


Dante Alighieri

"Dante Alighieri, 1265-1321, Italian poet, author of The Divine Comedy. A Florentine patrician, he fought on the side of the Guelphs but later supported the imperial party. In 1290, after the death of his exalted Beatrice (Beatrice Portinari, 1266-90), he plunged into the study of philosophy and Provençal poetry.

Politically active in Florence from 1295, he was banished in 1302 and became a citizen of all Italy, dying in Ravenna.

The Divine Comedy, a vernacular poem in 100 cantos (more than 14,000 lines), was composed in exile. It is the tale of the poet's journey through Hell and Purgatory (guided by Vergil) and through Heaven (guided by Beatrice, to whom the poem is a memorial.) Written in a complex pentameter form, terza rima, it is a magnificent synthesis of the medieval outlook, picturing a changeless universe ordered by God. Through it Dante established Tuscan as the literary language of Italy and gave rise to a vast literature. His works also include La vita nuova (c.1292), a collection of prose and lyrics celebrating Beatrice and ideal love; treatises on language and politics; eclogues; and epistles." From The Concise Columbia Encyclopedia. Copyright © 1991 by Columbia University

3.

Rating: 4/10

Site: Dante's Inferno (http://www.onlineuniversity.net/english/poetry/dantes-inferno/)

Comments: Okay for those looking for a quick Dante overview.

4.

Rating: 6/10

Site: Renaissance Dante in print (http://www.nd.edu/~italnet/Dante/)

Comments: "This exibition presents Renaissance editions of Dante's Divine Comedy from the John

A. Zahm, C.S.C., Dante Collection at the University of Notre Dame, together with selected treasures from The Newberry Library. The Zahm collection ranks among the top Dante collections in North America. Purchased for the most part by Zahm in 1902 from the Italian Dantophile Giulio Acquaticci, the 15th- and 16th- century imprints presented here form the heart of Zahm's collection, which totals nearly 3,000 volumes, including rare editions and critical studies from the Renaissance to the present. The nine incunable editions and nearly complete series of 16th-century imprints featured in this exhibit constitute essential primary sources for both the history of Dante's reception during the Renaissance and the early history of the printed book."

5.

Rating: 8/10

Site: (http://www.divinecomedy.org/divine_comedy.html)

Comments: "Welcome to the 1999 Research Edition of the Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri. This site features four full editions of the Divine Comedy online: the original Italian text, and three English translations, one by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, one by Rev. H.F. Cary, and the last by Allen Mandelbaum. Annotations from the Cary and Longfellow editions are also available."

6.

Rating: 4/10

Site: "Clickable" Inferno (http://www.carthage.edu/departments/english/dante/)

Comments: Selections from various editions of Inferno. Mostly text.

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